8-BALL Rules

SECTION 1: TEAM MATCH PLAY RULES

1.1

 OBJECT OF THE GAME
Eight-ball (8-ball) is a game played with a cue ball and fifteen object balls, 1 through 15. One shooter must pocket balls of the group numbered 1 to 7 (solid colors), while the other shooter must pocket balls from the group 9 through 15 (stripes). The shooter pocketing his group first and then legally pocketing the 8-ball wins the game.

1.2

 CALL YOUR POCKET

The NAPA 8-ball format is a "call your pocket" league. Making a ball in an unintended pocket is considered slop and does not count. Calling a pocket is done by either, verbally announcing the designated pocket to the opponent or any shooter on the opposing team, or by pointing at the pocket with your hand or pool cue.

It is encouraged that all balls be specified vocally to your opponent along with their intended pocket. Obvious balls and their respective pockets do not have to be specified, however, when performing a bank shot, a kick shot, a jump shot, a masse shot, or a combo shot, the shooter must call his or her intended object ball and pocket.

If the shooter does not call his or her intended object ball and pocket when performing a bank shot, a kick shot, a jump shot, a masse shot, or a combo shot, it is a loss of turn.

When calling your pocket, it is NEVER necessary to indicate details such as the number of cushions, banks, kisses, caroms, etc. Any ball pocketed on a foul remains pocketed, regardless of whether they belong to the shooter or the opponent.

1.3

 PLAYING TABLE - HOME FIELD ADVANTAGE

The home team always has "home field advantage". The home team gets to decide which table is to be used at the playing location. All matches are to commence at the designated league night starting time. If the preferred table chosen by the home team is occupied at the designated league start time another table must be chosen immediately. Under no circumstance should a visiting team be forced to wait for a table to be available which would postpone the league match to a later time.

1.4

 WHO PLAYS FIRST - HOME FIELD ADVANTAGE

The home team gets to determine if they would like to put up a shooter first or if the visiting team puts up a shooter first. After this is announced the designated team to put up first must announce which shooter they will be playing first. The opposing team can then put up the shooter they would like to challenge. After each match, putting up a shooter first will rotate between the teams until all of the matches are over.

1.5

 ORDER OF BREAK - LAG

Winner of the lag must break. No coin flipping. To perform the lag, both shooters are to simultaneously shoot a ball from behind the head string to the foot cushion and back toward the head cushion. Whichever shooter's ball comes to rest closest to the head cushion is winner of the lag. It does not matter if a shooter's ball touches the head cushion; the ball closest to the head cushion wins the lag.

  1. If a shooter, during their lag shot, knocks their ball into any pocket or off of the table it is a loss of the lag.
  2. If both shooters knock their balls into a pocket then both shooters are to re-lag.
  3. If, during the lag, both shooter's balls make contact with one another both shooters are to re-lag.
  4. If, during the lag, one of the shooter's balls travels passed the head cushion, and resides inside the jaws of one of the pockets closest to the head cushion without falling into the pocket, both shooters are to re-lag.
  5. If, during the lag, a shooter's ball makes contact with any foreign object such as a stick, human being, or rack it is a loss of the lag.
  6. The winner of each game breaks in the next.

1.6

 RACKING THE BALLS

The object balls (1-ball through 15-ball) are to be racked as tightly as possible in a triangular shape, with any strip or solid at the apex of the triangle and on the foot spot, the 8-ball in the middle of the triangle, a striped ball in one corner of the rack and a solid ball in the other corner. The base of the rack should be parallel to the foot cushion.

8-ball Rack Diagram:

If, after the balls have been racked, all balls in the rack are not in contact with one another, also known as a "loose rack", the shooter who is to break may request a re-rack. At which time the opposing shooter is to re-rack the balls so that all balls in the rack are properly contacting one another, also known as a "tight rack".

1.7

 LEGAL BREAK SHOT

To execute a legal break, the breaker, with the base of the cue ball behind the head string must either

  1. Pocket a ball.
  2. Drive at least four unique numbered balls to a cushion.

    NOTE: In the event a shooter places the base of the cue ball over the head string the opposing shooter must call it before the break shot is made, not after.

If the shooter performing the break shot, during their stroke, completely misses and makes no contact with the cue-ball (basically a "swing and a miss"), this is not considered a foul and the shooter may try the break shot again.

1.8

 BREAKING SCENARIOS
  1. DID NOT EXECUTE A LEGAL BREAK(see 1.7 above)
    If the breaking shooter did not execute a legal break (including a miscue) the incoming shooter has the option of
     
    1. Accepting the table in position and shooting.
    2. Taking cue ball in hand behind the head string and shooting the current position of the numbered balls.
    3. Asking for a re-rack, taking the cue ball in hand behind the head string and taking responsibility for the break. This option eliminates the possibility of a Rackless Match bonus point.
       
    NOTE: If the incoming shooter opts for (1) or (2) it is then considered a regular turn at the table and he must call his pocket. If the incoming shooter opts for (3) he does not have to call his pocket since it is considered a break.
     
  2. CUE BALL POCKETED OR DRIVEN OFF THE TABLE
    If the cue ball is pocketed or driven off the table during the break shot, it is a foul. The non-breaking shooter has cue ball behind the head string and the table is open.

    NOTE: If any object balls were driven off the table, they are to be returned to the table and placed on same foot spot where the rack took place in numerical order. If there are any balls on the foot spot or blocking the foot spot the balls that were knocked off the table are to be placed directly behind the balls blocking the foot spot toward the foot cushion.

    NOTE: The incoming shooter has cue ball behind the head string and may not shoot any object ball that is behind the head string, unless he first shoots the cue ball past the head string and causes the cue ball to come back behind the head string and hit the object ball.

  3. OBJECT BALL OFF TABLE
    If a shooter jumps an object ball off the table on the break shot, it is a foul and the incoming shooter has the option of

    1. Accepting the table in position and shooting.

    2. Taking cue ball behind the head string and shooting.

      NOTE: Any numbered balls that are knocked off the table are to be returned to the table and placed on same foot spot where the rack took place in numerical order. If there are any balls on the foot spot or blocking the foot spot the balls that were knocked off the table are to be placed directly behind the balls blocking the foot spot toward the foot cushion.

  4. CUE BALL BOUNCES INTO AIR
    If the cue ball bounces off the table into the air, does NOT hit another object other than the table or another ball, and lands back onto the table it is NOT a foul.

  5. CUE BALL BOUNCES INTO AIR AND HITS ANOTHER OBJECT
    If the cue ball bounces off the table into the air, hits another object other than the table or another ball, and lands back onto the table it is a foul. The non-breaking shooter has cue ball in hand behind the head string and the table is to remain open.

    NOTE: The incoming shooter has cue ball behind the head string and may not shoot an object ball that is behind the head string, unless he first shoots the cue ball past the head string and causes the cue ball to come back behind the head string and hit the object ball.

    NOTE: Any object balls that are knocked off the table are to be returned to the table and placed on same foot spot where the rack took place in numerical order. If there are any balls on the foot spot or blocking the foot spot the balls that were knocked off the table are to be placed directly behind the balls blocking the foot spot toward the foot cushion.

1.9

 8-BALL POCKETED ON BREAK

Legally pocketing the 8-ball on the break wins the game for the breaker; assuming no foul has been committed.

NOTE: When the 8-ball is pocketed on the break and the break did not meet all legal break requirements it results in a loss of game for the breaker.

1.10

 AFTER THE BREAK - OPEN TABLE

The table is always open immediately after the break shot. The shooter's designated group (solids or stripes) will NOT be determined until a shooter legally pockets a called object ball. The table is considered an "open table" when the choice of group (solid or stripes) has not yet been determined. When the table is open, it is legal to hit one group of balls in order to pocket another ball from the opposite group.

When the table is open, if a shooter pockets an object ball and scratches, the table remains open. The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand.

When the table is open, if a shooter pockets an object ball in any pocket other than the designated pocket, the table remains open to the incoming shooter who must shoot the table from the current position. The incoming shooter does not have cue ball in hand unless the previous shooter has committed a foul.

NOTE: The 8-ball can NEVER be struck first on a combination; this action would result in a ball in hand foul.

1.11

 LEGAL SHOT

On all shots (except on the break and when the table is open), the shooter must hit one of his group of balls first and

  1. Pocket a numbered ball.
  2. Cause the cue ball or any numbered ball to contact a cushion after initial cue ball contact with an object ball.

NOTE: It is permissible for the shooter to bank the cue ball off a cushion before contacting his object ball; however, after contact with his object ball, an object ball must be pocketed, or the cue ball or any numbered ball must contact a cushion. Failure to meet these requirements is a ball in hand foul.

1.12

 FOUL PENALTY

When a foul is committed on any shot other than the break, the opposing shooter gets cue ball in hand. This means that the shooter can place the cue ball anywhere on the table.  The only time the cue ball is required to be placed behind the headstring is when a foul is committed on the break.

1.13

 CUE BALL IN HAND

When the cue ball is in hand, the shooter may place the cue ball anywhere on the bed of the table, except in contact with another ball. When placing the cue ball in position, the shooter is allowed to adjust the placement of the cue ball with the cue stick but may not touch the cue ball with the ferrule or the tip. This rule also applies to break shots when the shooter has ball in hand behind the headstring.

  1. Allowing the cue ball (or any part of the hand or arm holding the cue ball) to come into contact with another ball on the bed of the table while the cue ball is in hand is a foul. The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand.
  2. Touching the cue ball with the ferrule of the cue stick or the tip of the cue stick is a foul. The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand.

1.14

 COMBINATION SHOTS

Combination shots are allowed; however, the 8-ball cannot be used as a first ball in the combination unless the shooter has pocketed all of his object balls and is on the 8-ball to win the game.

1.15

 ILLEGALLY POCKETED BALLS

An object ball is considered to be illegally pocketed when

  1. The object ball is pocketed on the same shot a foul is committed.
  2. The called ball did not go in the designated pocket. Illegally pocketed balls remain pocketed

1.16

 PLAYING THE 8-BALL

When shooting at the 8-ball

  1. A scratch or foul is NOT loss of game if the 8-ball is NOT pocketed. The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand.
  2. A scratch or foul is a loss of game, if the 8-ball is pocketed or knocked off the table.
  3. Pocketing the 8-ball in any pocket other than the designated pocket is a loss of game.
  4. A combination or billiard shot is perfectly legal as long as the 8-ball is hit first. The 8-ball can carom off of any number of balls and still be legally pocketed as long as the 8-ball is pocketed in the designated pocket by the shooter and the 8-ball is contacted first.

1.17

 LOSS OF GAME

A shooter loses the game if he commits any of the following infractions

  1. Pockets the 8-ball on the same stroke as the last of his group of balls.
  2. Pockets the 8-ball in a pocket other than the one designated.
  3. Pockets the 8-ball when it is not the legal object ball.
  4. Knocks the 8-ball off the table.
  5. Receives a time out or coaching from any other person during their turn after a first warning is given, if the league is a "No Coaching" league.

1.18

 STALEMATED GAME

If, after 3 consecutive turns at the table by each shooter (6 turns total), both shooters agree that attempting to pocket or move an object ball will result in loss of game, the balls may be re-racked, if both players agree to a stalemate, with the original breaker of the stalemated game breaking again

SECTION 2: COACHING

2.1

 COACHING & TIME OUTS

NAPA offers "no coaching" and "coaching" league formats.

In the NAPA "no coaching" league format, players are not allowed to receive coaching at anytime, while it is their turn at the pool table.  They ARE allowed to receive coaching when it is NOT their turn at the table.

In the NAPA "coaching" league format, the following grid must be followed at all times during league and match play

PLAYER CLASS SKILL LEVELS TIME OUTS ALLOWED
Grandmaster Class 110 and higher None
Master Class 90 to 109 None
Class A 70 to 89 None
Class B 50 to 69 1
Class C 30 to 49 1
Class D 10 to 29 2
Class E 9 and under 2


The shooter’s coach must be a shooter on his or her team. Only the shooter, team captain, acting team captain or designated coach may call a time out. The designated coach is allowed to change at any time during a shooter's match. The designated coach does not have to always be the same person during the shooter's match. If a time out is called, the time out must be taken. The coach may not at any time consult, converse, or communicate with another person other than the shooter during the time out.

NOTE:
At any time when it is your player's turn at the table, any mention (by the shooter or any team member) of a "time out", "want to talk about it", or any action or comment that might suggest a Time Out, a Time Out will be taken, if one is available to the player. If a Time Out is not available to the player, that is a cue ball-in-hand foul.

 The following are NOT considered coaching:

  1. Wishing your teammate good luck.
  2. Reminding your teammate to chalk up.
  3. Reminding your teammate to call their pocket.
  4. Telling your teammate a foul has occurred.
  5. Telling your teammate that he has ball-in-hand.
  6. Answering or asking a rule question.
  7. Complimenting your teammate for good play.
  8. Quietly, discussing strategy, advice, etc. in a non-distracting fashion, when it is NOT their turn. This is considered "sideline coaching" and is legal, however, ALL sideline coaching must cease immediately after your opponent's turn has ended (the last ball stops rolling).

NOTE: Telling your teammate which category of balls he or she has is a foul and the incoming shooter receives cue ball in hand.

2.2

 LEGAL COACHING

The coach may

  1. Offer coaching advice to the shooter
  2. Touch the table at any time
  3. Place the shooter’s cue ball on to the table, into position, in a cue ball in hand situation
  4. Use the shooter's pool cue to show an example of how to line up a shot

2.3

 ILLEGAL COACHING

The coach may not

  1. Mark any part of the table with chalk or any foreign object
  2. Place markers or any foreign object on the table
  3. Touch any ball at any time

NOTE: Any violation of these three items is cue ball in hand for the opponent.

2.4

 TIME OUT TIME LIMIT

A shooter’s time out limit cannot exceed 1-minute. Exceeding 1-minute is a foul and the incoming shooter has cue ball in hand.

SECTION 3: INTERFERENCE AND FOULS

3.1

 TOUCHING OR MOVING THE CUE BALL

Touching or causing even the slightest movement of the cue ball (other than a normal shot), even accidentally, is a foul.

3.2

 CONTACTING THE CUE BALL AFTER SHOOTING

If a shooter makes a shot and after the shot is made makes contact with the cue ball in any way before the cue ball has come to a complete stop or final resting position, it is a foul.The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand. Any object balls that were pocketed shall remain pocketed. If the 8-ball is pocketed the result is a loss of game for the shooter.

3.3

 INTERFERENCE
  1. CUEBALL IN HAND
    Touching any object ball with the cue ball while it is cue ball in hand is a foul. The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand.
     
  2. MOVING OBJECT BALL
    Touching a moving object ball is a foul as is allowing a moving ball to hit a foreign object. The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand.
     
  3. ACCIDENTALLY MOVING A BALL
    Any ball moved accidentally can only be replaced by the opponent. However the opponent may exercise the option of keeping disturbed ball(s) in the new position if they so choose. The shooter who has committed the infraction may move the object ball back to the original position only after receiving consent from the opponent. If the shooter who has infracted touches any of the disturbed balls without consent of opponent it will result in a loss of turn and the incoming shooter has cue ball in hand. It is not a foul until or unless the shooter touches a ball without permission.
     
  4. POCKETING A BALL
    Any ball that is moved accidentally either by hand, stick, by any foreign object, or any part of the shooter’s body and the ball is pocketed (or causes another ball to be pocketed) as a result of the contact results in a loss of turn for the shooter causing the foul. The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand. The ball remains pocketed.
     
  5. ACT OF GOD OR NON-SHOOTER INTERFERENCE
    If the balls are moved (or a shooter is bumped such that play is directly affected) by a non-shooter during the match or an act of god, the balls shall be replaced as near as possible to their original positions immediately prior to the incident and play shall resume with no penalty on the shooter affected. If the balls cannot be restored to their original positions or if the disruption to the balls pockets the 8-ball, then both shooters shall replay the game with the original shooter breaking.

3.4

 INTERFERENCE - POCKETING THE 8-BALL

If the 8-ball is moved accidentally either by hand, stick, by any foreign object, or any part of the shooter’s body and the 8-ball is pocketed as a result of the contact the result is a loss of game for the shooter causing the foul.

3.5

 SCRATCH SHOT

Pocketing the cue ball or driving it off the table is a ball in hand foul.

3.6

 BAD HIT

If the first object ball contacted by the cue ball is not a numbered ball from the shooter’s established group, it is a ball in hand foul. If the shooter has no remaining balls from his/her group in play, the 8-ball must then be contacted first

3.7

 NO CUSHION

If, after the cue ball first strikes a legal ball, and neither the cue ball nor any other ball on the table hits a cushion or is pocketed, it is a ball in hand foul.

3.8

 BALLS JUMPED OFF THE TABLE

If any ball is jumped off the table and comes to rest off of the playing surface, it is a ball in hand foul and loss of turn, unless it is the 8-ball, which is a loss of game. All balls that come to rest off of the playing surface are placed on the same foot spot where the rack took place in numerical order. If there are any balls on the foot spot or blocking the foot spot the balls that were knocked off the table are to be placed directly behind the balls blocking the foot spot toward the foot cushion.

3.9

 FOREIGN OBJECT OFF THE TABLE

Causing any ball to be jumped off of the table, come into contact with any foreign object while off of the table,then lands back onto the playing surface is a foul.The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand. The table is to remain in its current position where the balls came to a final rest. If the 8-ball is pocketed during this foul it is a loss of game for the shooter.

3.10

 FOOT ON THE FLOOR

Failure to have at least one foot on the floor at the moment the cue tip strikes the cue ball is a foul, unless the shooter is prevented by an obvious, physical handicap and that handicap is very clearly declared to both team captains and all participating shooters before the team match commences.

3.11

 JUMP SHOT

Any miscue on a jump shot is a cue ball in hand foul. A legal jump shot must be executed by stroking down through the cue ball (no scooping or miscues).

3.12

 SHOOTING WHILE BALLS ARE IN MOTION

Shooting while any ball is moving or spinning is a ball in hand foul.

3.13

 DOUBLE HIT

If the cue tip strikes the cue ball twice on the same stroke it is a ball in hand foul.

3.14

 HEAD STRING

The base of the cue ball must be inside the head string on the break

3.15

 MARKING THE TABLE

Marking the table in any way, which could provide a shooter with an advantage in executing a shot, is a ball in hand foul. Placing of the cue chalk on the rail by the shooter is not considered marking the table.

3.16

 OUT OF PLAY BALLS

Out of play balls may not be used to measure gaps or spaces of any kind. Using any equipment in a non-customary manner is a ball in hand foul.

3.17

 EXHAUSTING TIME ALLOTMENT

After a time clock (or watch) has been instituted, any violation of the allotted shot time, is a cue ball in hand foul. See rule “Time Allotment” under the section titled “General Rules”

3.18

 ONE FOUL PER TURN

A shooter can only commit one foul per turn. If a shooter commits several fouls on one shot, they are counted as only one foul.

SECTION 4: EQUIPMENT RULES

4.1

 POOL CUE SPECIFICATIONS

Pool cues must meet the following specifications:

  1. The width of the cue tip must not exceed 14 millimeters. There is no minimum width.
  2. The weight of the pool cue must not exceed 25 ounces. There is no minimum weight.
  3. The length of the cue must be at least 40 inches. There is no maximum length.

4.2

 BRIDGE

Using a standard billiard bridge is legal during a shooter’s shot

4.3

 CUE EXTENDERS

Using a cue extender is legal during a shooter’s shot.

4.4

 LASER SIGHT

Using a laser site is NOT legal during a shooter’s shot. Doing so will result in a loss of turn. The incoming shooter has cue ball in hand.

4.5

 OUTSIDE BALLS

Using any balls other than the standard pool balls, normally used at the playing location, must be agreed upon by both team captains and the playing venue management.

4.6

 JUMP CUES

Jump cues are allowed. You may use your regular pool cue or any manufactured jump cue. Using a half cue or just a shaft is a cue ball in hand foul.

4.7

 EAR BUDS/EAR PHONES

Use of earbuds or earphones at the local league level is determined by your local league operator. Earbuds and earphones are not allowed at any NAPA sanctioned regional event or national event.

SECTION 5: SCORING RULES

5.1

 WINNING SHOOTER POINTS
  1. If a shoot gets a perfect win. No losses in their match. 20 points.
  2. If a shooter wins their match by shooter forfeit, 20 points..
  3. If a shooter wins their match with one or more games lost in their match, 14 points.
  4. If a shooter wins their match by team forfeit, 14 points.

5.2

 LOSING SHOOTER POINTS
  1. If a shooter loses their match but has at least one game won in their match, 3 points.
  2. If a shooter loses their match and has no games won in their match, 1 point.
  3. If a shooter loses their match due to forfeit, 0 points.

5.3

 BONUS POINTS
  1. Rackless match = 1 point.
  2. Break and Run = 1 point for each. 
  3. 8-ball on the Break = 1 point for each.

5.4

 FORFEITING INDIVIDUAL MATCHES

When a team must forfeit individual matches they are to write “Forfeit” in the player 2 shooter's name section of their score sheet on the match they must forfeit. When forfeiting a match the team that had to forfeit receives 0 points for that match. The opposing team receives 20 points for the forfeited match if they pay their nightly dues for the forfeited match. If nightly dues are not in their team packet no points will be awarded for the win. The team getting the win may elect which shooter on their team will be credited with the 20 points for the NAPA individual point race. The shooter's name must be placed on the score sheet; the shooter MUST be present and must NOT have already played a match that day, in that division.

In NAPA singles leagues, forfeits are always worth 20 points.

5.5

 FORFEITING TEAM MATCHES

If a team is a “no show” or a team has to forfeit an entire match, the opposing team is awarded a standard win (14 points) for each match on their score sheet. The team which is awarded the forfeited wins must pay their entire team’s nightly league dues in order to receive points. If the nightly league dues are not in the team packet at the end of match night, no points will be awarded. The team that has forfeited the match will receive 0 points.

NOTE: If a team has at least one shooter, their team does NOT have to forfeit the entire team match. The lone shooter should go ahead and play their individual match. If the shooter’s teammates are still a “no show” at the end of the individual match the team will be credited with the one individual match played and all points accumulated during that match and simply forfeit the remaining individual matches. The remaining forfeited matches are considered ‘individual’ matches and the opposing team is credited with 20 points for each one as stated in rule 5.4 (above).

If an entire team forfeits three weeks during a session the team will be dropped from the division.

5.6

 INCOMPLETE TEAM PACKETS

Any team packet that is incomplete or any live scores that are incomplete can result in a 30 point penalty from that team’s total session points. In order to submit a complete team packet every team must do the following:

  1. Submit a completed score sheet in their packet at the end of each league night or submit a completed score sheet on NAPA Play, the live mobile scoring app.
  2. Submit all shooter dues along with the team packet at the end of each league night.
  3. Submit all venue/bar dues along with the team packet at the end of each league night if venue/bar dues are required by the local NAPA league operator.

5.7

 LACK OF SHOOTER MONIES

Any team packet that is missing a shooter’s nightly league dues will result in that shooter’s game being forfeited even if the match was played. There will also be a 30 point deduction from that team’s total session points for an incomplete team packet. Every team is responsible for their packet containing the full nightly league dues for each match played.

5.8

 FINAL SCORE SHEETS

NAPA recognizes a signed score sheet (or completed score entry in NAPA Play) as a final agreement, between both team captains, that the score sheet is correct and is ready to be submitted to the NAPA main office. However, NAPA recognizes that there are times, when, after a completed score sheet has been submitted to the NAPA, there may be a mistake on the score sheet, later recognized, and a change needs to be made to the score of a game or an entire match. Contact your local league operator and inform him or her of the mistake.  The local league operator will contact the NAPA main office and have the scores corrected. 

SECTION 6: SHOOTER RULES

6.1

 SHOOTER'S AGE

All shooters, regardless of age, are allowed to participate in local NAPA leagues as long as the shooter's age is in accordance with local laws for the playing establishment(s) in which local NAPA leagues are to be played. Check with your local NAPA representative for age requirements of the local playing establishments in your area. The NAPA must be notified of any shooter participating in NAPA local leagues under the age of 18 by the local NAPA league operator.

6.2

 PLAYER HEIGHT - THE JON NORTHROP RULE

If a shooter's height, standing without shoes on, measures less than five (5) feet tall, the shooter is permitted to use a stool (or some other object) that will raise the shooter's height to five (5) feet tall, when shooting at the table.

6.3

 PROOF OF SHOOTER IDENTITY

Your opponent has the right to request the proof of identity from you and your teammates. Positive identification is a picture I.D., for example a legal state I.D., a driver’s license or passport.

6.4

 ONE TEAM

Shooters cannot play for multiple teams in the same division. Shooters can only play for one team, per division, on league day/night.

6.5

 NUMBER OF MATCHES

Shooters may only play one match, per division, per game format, per league day/night.

6.6

 CHANGING TEAMS

Shooters cannot change teams, if they have already played a match during the current session, without the approval of the NAPA main office. To request a shooter change teams, you must:

  1. Contact your local NAPA league operator and inform him/her of the change request.
  2. The local NAPA league operator must then submit the request to the NAPA main office.
  3. NAPA will then make a decision on the team change request and inform the local NAPA league operator on the decision.

6.7

 ADDING SHOOTERS

Teams are allowed to recruit new shooters for their team up through week five (5) of each session. This includes BYE weeks. If a team already has a full 8-man roster with the league the team can only recruit new shooters to their roster if an existing shooter on the roster is removed from the roster. Once a shooter is removed from the roster they cannot be placed back onto the roster in the same session or season.

If you are adding a new shooter for your team on league night and the shooter is not yet listed on your roster you must notify  the opposing team’s captain who the new shooter is and their skill level before the team match begins. If you do not notify the opposing team captain before the team match begins the new shooter will be ineligible to play on that league night. Team captains can pencil in the shooter’s name on the score sheet and the NAPA will officially add the shooter to the roster after league night has completed.

6.8

 SHOOTERS WITH NO PREVIOUS LEAGUE EXPERIENCE

Any new shooter having previously never played in the NAPA or any organized billiard league should receive the following skill level:

  1. Female shooters start with a skill level of 40
  2. Male shooters start with a skill level of 50

6.9

 SHOOTERS WITH PREVIOUS LEAGUE EXPERIENCE

If a shooter has previous NAPA league experience the shooter must be entered into the division at their most recent skill level of the same game format. If the shooter does not have a skill level for the game format being played the shooter must be entered into the division at his highest current NAPA skill level from any NAPA game format.

If a shooter does not have NAPA league experience, yet has previous organized league experience, and their league experience is from the BCAPL, APA, or TAP then the shooter should start with the following:

BCAPL APA TAP
BCAPL
NAPA
2
20
3
30
4
40
5
50
6
60
7
70
8
80
9
90
10
100
APA
NAPA
1
20
2
30
3
40
4
50
5
60
6
70
7
80
8
90
9
100
TAP
NAPA
2
40
3
50
4
60
5
70
6
80
7
90
   
   
   

 

NOTE: If a new shooter does have previous league experience, yet the league is not any of the leagues mentioned above, then the shooter should be entered at a skill level determined by the local NAPA league operator or entered as if the shooter does not have previous league experience.

SECTION 7: TEAM RULES

7.1

 TEAM PLAYING LOCATION

Teams are responsible for choosing their home playing location. The location must have a standard bar table or regulation pool table. The location must be a place of business and not a person’s home or residential location. Examples would be:

  1. A bar or night club .
  2. A pool hall.
  3. The local VFW or local Moose Lodge.

7.2

 MOVING HOME LOCATION

Teams are allowed to move their “home” location at any time. Any sponsorship monies paid to the league for the team by the previous home location becomes the team’s responsibility.

7.3

 TEAM CAPTAINS

Every team must have a team captain. The team captain is responsible for the sportsmanship of their team, ensuring the team score sheet is accurate and having the team packet delivered to the proper drop off location at the end of league night. The NAPA does not allow co-captains.

7.4

 CHANGING TEAM CAPTAIN

A team's captain can be changed at anytime by majority vote amongst the team's shooters. If the captain of a team is changed, the team must notify their local NAPA league operator of the change, immediately.

7.5

 NUMBER OF TEAM SHOOTERS

Teams can have no more than maximum allowed shooters on their team roster during any session. In 3-man team leagues the maximum is six (6) shooters, in 4-man team leagues the maximum is seven (7) shooters and in 5-man team leagues the maximum is eight (8) shooters. Teams are required to have a minimum number of shooters on their roster. The minimum number of shooters is three (3) for 3-man team leagues, four (4) for 4-man team leagues and five (5) for 5-man team leagues.

7.6

 MAXIMUM TEAM SKILL LEVEL

In Standard Limit leagues and Modified Limit leagues the total skill level of all shooters fielded on league night for each team cannot exceed the maximum team skill level set forth by the NAPA and it's local league operator.

The only time the total skill level of all shooters fielded can exceed the maximum team skill level limit is:

  1. If both team captains agree to allow the match to continue even though one or both teams will go over the limit. If both team captains agree, the match must continue and can not be retracted. 
  2. If neither team captain realizes that one of the teams is going to go over the maximum limit, players are put up to shoot one another and a lag is performed by both players, the match must continue regardless.


In Standard Limit leagues, the team skill level limits are as follows:

  1. In 3-man team leagues the maximum team skill level on league night is 195.
  2. In 4-man team leagues the maximum team skill level on league night is 260 .
  3. In 5-man team leagues the maximum team skill level on league night is 325.

In Modified Limit leagues, the team skill level limits are set at the beginning of the session by the local league operator:

The maximum liability a shooter can have against his team’s total skill level on league night is 110 points. For example, if a shooter, who has a skill level of 125, is fielded to play for his team, only 110 points will count towards his team’s total skill level.

SECTION 8: PLAYOFF RULES

8.1

 PLAYOFFS OPTIONAL

Playoffs are completely optional. The local NAPA league operator has the right to hold playoffs if he or she so chooses, but they are not required. If the local NAPA League Operator does choose to hold playoffs, the team who wins the playoffs will be declared the championship team and receive the qualification rights for the NAPA Nationals. If the local NAPA League Operator chooses not to hold playoffs, the team finishing with the most points after the final week of the session will receive the qualification rights for the NAPA Nationals.

8.2

 END OF SESSION - TIED TEAMS

If, after the final week of the regular session, two or more teams are tied in the point standings, the tie breaker is to be determined by the following criteria and in this exact order:

  1. Most team matches won during the regular session.
  2. The team that won the most head-to-head matches between the teams that are tied, during the regular session.
  3. The top point shooter for each team that has the most points, during the regular session.

8.3

 PLAYOFF ELIGIBILITY

All shooters must have played a minimum of four (4) matches in the division, during the current session, in order to be eligible for playoffs. Your local league operator has the option of requiring more than four (4) matches if they so choose. Required number of matches must be announced to all team captains at the begining of the session. If official notice is not given out to all team captains at the beginning of the session then four (4) matches will be required.

8.4

 ATTENDING TEAMS

The number of teams attending the playoffs is determined by the number of teams in your local division. Check with your local NAPA league operator for details.

8.5

 PLAYOFF POINTS

All points accrued by teams during the regular session are not carried over into the playoffs. During playoff matches, the team that scores the most points is the winner of that playoff match and advances further into the playoffs.

8.6

 TIED PLAYOFF MATCHES

In the event there is a tie, in total points (not matches), between two teams in a playoff match, the tie breaker is to be determined as follows:

  1. In a 3-man team league, the team that won the most matches out of the three matches played is declared the winner.
  2. In a 5-man team league, the team that won the most matches out of the five matches played is declared the winner.
  3. In a 4-man team league both teams are to play a fifth match. Both teams must put up one of their shooters to play the final tie break match. The higher seeded team gets to decide if they are to put up a shooter first or the opposing team is to put up a shooter first. The participating shooters on both teams must be a shooter on the team roster, present at the playing location and meets the requirements to play in the playoffs. It does not matter if the chosen shooter has already played a NAPA match on that day, any shooter can be chosen.

8.7

 PLAYOFFS - QUALIFYING FOR THE NATIONALS

After the playoffs have been completed and a championship team has been declared, all shooters who played on the championship team who have met the minimum requirements of five (5) matches played during the regular session qualify for the NAPA Nationals.

SECTION 9: GENERAL RULES

9.1

 TIME ALLOTMENT

By default, shooters are allowed 60 seconds to execute each shot when it is their turn at the table. Your local league operator has the ability to set each division's time allotment between 30 seconds and 90 seconds. If a time allotment is not set at the beginning of a session, the default time allotment is to be 60 seconds.

Exceeding the time allotment is considered slow play. The time allotment commences after your opponent's shot ends and all the balls come to rest on the table. After a first warning, a shooter continues to slow play, the team captains from both teams may institute a time clock (or stop watch). After a time clock is instituted any violation of the time allotment is a cue ball in hand foul.

9.2

 CUSHION FROZEN OBJECT BALL

If an object ball is frozen on the cushion, the shooter must cause the cue ball or any other ball to make contact with a cushion after contact with the frozen ball in order for the shot to be legal.

9.3

 SHOOTING FROZEN BALLS

If the cue ball is frozen to the object ball, pushing through the cue ball is a legal hit. If there is separation between the two balls equal to or less than the width of a piece of chalk, the shooter must keep from double hitting the cue ball. This can be executed by elevating the cue stick to, at least, a 45 degree angle. As long as this attempt is made, no foul can be called. If the distance between the two balls is greater than the width of a standard size piece of billiard chalk, a double hit of the cue ball is a ball-in-hand foul. When confronted with this situation, it is strongly recommended that a third party or referee be called to watch the hit to avoid controversy. If a third party is not called, it is the shooter’s decision.

NOTE: You do not have to elevate your cue stick if you know how to make this shot without double hitting the cue ball. Elevating your cue stick is a recommendation to avoid being called for a foul

9.4

 MASSE SHOTS

Masse shots are legal.

9.5

 JUMP SHOTS

Jump cues are allowed. It is legal to cause the cue ball to leave the surface of the table by elevating the butt of the cue and, with a downward stroke, force the cue ball to rise off the playing surface. For the shot to be legal only the cue tip may touch the cue ball - the shot must not be "scooped" by the ferrule or shaft. Any miscue on a jump shot is a cue ball in hand foul. Shooters are not allowed to break their cues down, to the shaft only, in order to attempt jump shots. See the rule titled "Jump Shot"  under the section "Interference and Fouls" in this manual.

9.6

 SAFETY SHOT

On any shot after the break, for tactical reasons, a shooter may choose to pocket a "called" object ball into its proper pocket and also discontinue his turn at the table by declaring "safety" in advance. A safety shot is defined as a legal shot. If the shooter intends to play a safety by pocketing a "called" object ball into its proper pocket, then prior to the shot, he must declare a "safety", verbally, to his opponent. If this is NOT done, and one of the shooter's object balls is pocketed, the shooter will be required to shoot again. Any ball pocketed on a safety shot remains pocketed. Calling a safety on the first shot after the break is legal; however, the table continues to remain open for the incoming shooter.

9.7

 DISPUTED SHOTS

It is the opponent's responsibility to ask the shooter to wait before making a shot when the opponent believes the previous shot was a foul. If the shooters cannot agree on the status of the last shot, the captains must make a ruling. If the captains cannot reach an agreement contact your local NAPA representative.

NOTE: If the shooter proceeds with the next shot (after having been asked by the opponent to wait), it is a foul and the opponent is awarded ball-in-hand. If the opponent does not dispute the shot before the next shot is played, the shot cannot be questioned and is assumed legal.

9.8

 CLOSE OR QUESTIONABLE SHOTS

It is the responsibility of all shooters to recognize the potential for a disputable shot. If a disputable shot is recognized, it is the responsibility of the shooter, the opponent, and both team captains to appoint themselves or other participating players, listed on either roster, to watch the shot being played and determine a ruling based on the outcome of the shot played.

9.9

 LATE ARRIVAL

Matches are to begin at the designated time set by the local NAPA league operator. At least one (1) player on a team's roster must be present at the playing venue no later than fifteen (15) minutes after the scheduled start time. For example: If your matches are to begin at 7:00pm, a minimum of one player on the roster must be present by 7:15pm. If no players are present within fifteen (15) minutes of the original start time, then a team forfeit must be declared. In the event of individual late arrivals, shooters must be present by the time the last shot is made on the match before theirs is to begin. If, by that time, no shooter, already on the team roster, is available to play that match, that match and any that follow are to be forfeited.

If a player is present or if multiple players are present for a team and they refuse to play because the rest of their team did not show up on time, then it is an automatic team forfeit.

9.10

 MULTIPLE TABLES

Team matches may be played on multiple tables at the same time, at anytime, during a league match. Playing on only one table is not required.

9.11

 RULES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Due to the ever-changing nature of sports and the situations that can and do occur, the NAPA reserves the right to make rulings and rule modifications as necessary and at any time. The NAPA also reserves the right to make exceptions to rules in order to promote fairness.

9.12

 PROTESTS AND DISPUTES

In general, all protests, disputes and complaints should be made by your team captain to your NAPA representative. Most protests and disputes should be settled immediately through compromise, common sense, and by referring to this manual.

9.13

 HIGHEST AUTHORITY

The NAPA is the highest authority concerning all league rulings.

9.14

 NO CHOOSING THE FORFEITED MATCHES

If a team is forced to forfeit an individual match during league night, either due to the Max Team Skill Level rule or being short on the required number of shooters, the team is not allowed decide on which match can be forfeited. All eligible shooters who are present MUST play before the forfeited match occurs. Secondly, anytime a team has to forfeit an individual match, because of a no-show, every match afterwards that evening is automatically a forfeit a well.

9.15

 BALLS MOVING SPONTANEOUSLY - 5 SECOND RULE

A shooter's shot is considered completed after all balls have come to a final resting position. If, within five (5) seconds of all balls reaching their final resting position, a ball shifts, turns or otherwise moves by itself, the ball shall remain in the position it assumed and play continues.

A hanging ball that falls into a pocket by itself after being motionless for 5 seconds (or longer) shall remain pocketed and play will continue. If the hanging ball is the 8-ball or the cue ball, that ball should be replaced as near as possible to its original position immediately prior to the incident and play continues. 

NOTE: In regard to coaching leagues, no coaching is allowed once all balls come to rest and it is the incoming player's turn at the table.

SECTION 10: CODE OF CONDUCT

10.1

 SPORTSMANSHIP

The NAPA is a pool league designed for fun and entertainment. Proper sportsmanship is expected from all shooters at all times.The NAPA reserves the right to ban or suspend any shooter, at anytime, for any reason from future play.

  1. UNSPORTSMANLIKE BEHAVIOR; HECKLING

    Heckling a shooter, while it is their turn at the table, is a foul.
    1. Any time, any opposing team player, heckles a shooter, while it is their turn at the table, and the shooter is shooting for a win on the 8-ball, whether by combination, or direct shot, it is considered a concession of game for the team with whom the heckler plays on. The shooter who was being heckled, gets the break in the next game, if the conceded game has not ended the match.
    2. Any time, any opposing team player, heckles a shooter, while it is their turn at the table, and the shooter is not shooting for a win on the 8-ball, it is the team captain’s responsibility to warn the heckler of the infraction. If the opposing team player continues to heckle any shooter(s) during their turn at the table, after the warning has been given, the team captain’s from both teams must immediately declare a forfeit of the match between the two shooters . The shooter who was being heckled will receive twenty (20) points for their match and the heckler’s team will receive zero (0) points for their match. Both team captains should note on their score sheet the shooter who caused the heckling. The NAPA will then address the situation with the shooter as heckling displays poor sportsmanship and is against the rules of league play.
  2. UNSPORTSMANLIKE BEHAVIOR; DISTRACTING YOUR OPPONENT

    Distracting a shooter, while it is their turn at the table, is a foul. This includes any outward motion during your opponent’s shot such as yelling, screaming, booing, throwing objects, standing closer than an arm’s length to the table, grabbing chalk from the table, standing in a shooter’s direct line of vision or any attempt to embarrass or humiliate your opponent.
    1. Any time, any opposing team player, distracts a shooter, while it is their turn at the table, and the shooter is shooting for a win on the 8-ball, whether by combination, or direct shot, it is considered concession of game for the team with whom the heckler plays on. The shooter who was being heckled, gets the break in the next game, if the conceded game has not ended the match.
    2. Any time, any opposing team player, distracts a shooter, while it is their turn at the table, and the shooter is not shooting for a win on the 8-ball, it is the team captain’s responsibility to warn the heckler of the infraction. If the opposing team player continues to heckle any shooter(s) during their turn at the table, after the warning has been given, the team captain’s from both teams must immediately declare a forfeit of the match between the two shooters. The shooter who was being heckled will receive twenty (20) points for their match and the heckler’s team will receive zero (0) points for their match. Both team captains should note on their score sheet the shooter who caused the heckling. The NAPA will then address the situation with the shooter as heckling displays poor sportsmanship and is against the rules of league play.
       
  3. UNSPORTSMAN LIKE BEHAVIOR ; GENERAL

    Any shooter displaying unsportsmanlike behavior at ANY time during NAPA league play such as throwing objects, swearing at other shooters, using racial slurs, any type of physical or verbal violence are subject to being permanently banned from NAPA league play by the local NAPA league operator.

10.2

 CHEATING

The NAPA reserves the right to ban or suspend any shooter, for any reason, at any time for cheating. Sandbagging, false scoring, hidden signals or illegal coaching will result in you being banned or suspend from play in the NAPA.

10.3

 GAMBLING

The NAPA reserves the right to ban or suspend any shooter, for any reason, at any time for gambling on any NAPA held event.

10.4

 CONCESSION OF A GAME

In order to concede a game, you need only:

  1. Say “Good Game” , “Good match”, “Congratulations”, or any congratulatory phrase that acknowledges your loss; anytime during your opponents turn at the table.
  2. Break down your shooting cue anytime during your opponents turn at the table.
  3. Pick up or grab the rack anytime during your opponents turn at the table.
  4. Pick up a ball or touch a ball anytime during your opponents turn at the table.

    NOTE: A shooter may break down his or her shaft during a match, only to change shafts, and only after telling their opponent ahead of time.

SECTION 11: NAPA NATIONALS ELIGIBILITY

11.1

 CHAMPIONSHIP DETAILS

The NAPA Nationals is an annual championship held for all shooters who qualify for participation. All qualified shooters are placed into their respective class bracket based on their skill level. The NAPA reserves the right to adjust a shooters skill level at any time before, during, or after the NAPA Nationals in order to create a fair and balanced playing field.

11.2

 HOW TO QUALIFY
Five 8-ball matches played in your local league between June 1st and May 31st qualifies you for the NAPA Nationals 8-ball Championship.

11.3

 NAPA NATIONALS CLASS BRACKETS
  1. GRANDMASTER CLASS–Skill Level of 110 and higher
  2. MASTER CLASS–Skill Level of 90 to 109
  3. CLASS A–Skill Level of 70 to 89
  4. CLASS B–Skill Level of 50 to 69
  5. CLASS C–Skill Level of 30 to 49
  6. CLASS D–Skill Level of 10 to 29
  7. CLASS E–Skill Level of 9 and under